North Lake Tahoe Attractions for a History Buff’s Journey

There’s a deep-rooted relationship between Lake Tahoe and some of the major events that shaped our nation, and one look at the museums in the region tells us that it was a complicated relationship. Some of the industry tycoons made their home in this area, thus converting the sleepy towns into bustling hubs of industry. And while many of the inhabitants preferred the old ways, there was no stopping progress. Even if not everybody agreed, it was actually progressing to mine and build factories that polluted the air and wreaked havoc on the environment. Still, this was part of the region’s history. And as mining became less and less profitable, most of the mines were shut down, along with the towns that sprang around them. Read below to learn more about these historic North Lake Tahoe attractions!

Vikingsholm

Tucked away at Emerald Bay on Lake Tahoe, this structure is nicknamed the “hidden castle.” It’s not just the natural beauty surrounding it, but the castle itself is a jewel of architecture and one of the top Lake Tahoe tourist attractions. The castle is open to the public during the summer months. Each tour lasts for about 30 minutes and covers the accessible parts of the castle and the gardens. The guided tours give you a brief history of the castle and the first owner Bill Holiday, who was dubbed the king of transport. That was in 1860, when stagecoaches were the most common means of transport. Tickets cost $10 for adults, $7 for students, and are free for children under 7.

Hellman-Ehrman Mansion

This is another home of a business magnate that was later acquired by the California State Park System and turned into a museum, it’s not an ordinary house; it’s an estate that covers over 1,975 acres. Visiting it will take more than a half hour to cover. Built in 1903, it was considered the most cutting-edge not just in architecture, but as far as modern households were concerned as well. It had electric light which a steam generator supplied with power. It also had indoor plumbing, which was a revolutionary concept at the time. Running water was pumped directly from Lake Tahoe. Public tours are available from mid-June till Memorial Day.

North Lake Tahoe Historical Society and its Lake Tahoe Tourist Attractions

The Society sponsors many North Lake Tahoe attractions such as museums, including Marian Steinbach Indian Basket Museum, Gatekeepers Museum, and Watson Cabin. They also hold many special events and special exhibits throughout the year. The Society’s mission is to preserve the history of the region for future generations. They collect ancient buildings and maintain and protect them.

Taking a tour of one of the many preserved buildings in the area tells you something about the layered history of Lake Tahoe. Give us a call today to book one of our beautiful vacation rentals and to learn more about Lake Tahoe tourist attractions!